Electricity and Vitality

I just realized that I am a miracle. I knew of course that synapses fire in my brain and send messages to other parts of my body. I also knew that if my heart stops, a nearby doctor who just happens to be carrying a defibrillator, could send a shock of electricity into my heart and start it beating again. But I didn’t ACTUALLY REALIZE that I am a LITERALLY a walking circuitry of electricity. I have amps and voltage running throughout my body and I am in charge of it all! Tech giant Panasonic know this and they’re working on creating a bio-battery to use human voltage! “Beam me up Scotty.”

When I have a thought, and I decide to go with it, I send electrical signals from my brain and make my body do whatever I want it to do. Open a door, skate on ice, send a thank you note, start an argument….anything! I am a power-station for whatever I want to create in my life.

Our body sends messages from cell to cell and gets us to do something. It’s about the exchange of positive and negative ions. Right now all the cells in your body that are NOT sending messages have a slight negative charge of potassium ions. Outside them are sodium ions that carry a positive charge. In order to send a message; the negatively charged cells have to open up like a gate and allow the positive ions to interact and generate an electrical impulse.

If you have ever watched a young child running and bouncing off furniture, you are getting a first-hand view of human voltage at play. And if you have ever watched someone get really angry, you are seeing human voltage running wild.

The problem is that our human voltage is so powerful and so fast we often don’t realize that we are in charge of the charge. It’s like switching between a 1 and 0—the flip between positive and negative is practically immediate. If we’re not aware of the switch, suddenly, we are reacting without thinking about the consequences.

In a way, it’s about slowing down, the impulse. But when we are in pain the reaction is fast. Think of when you stub your toe. The impulse triggers the gate on the next cell to open, creating another charge, and so on until the electrical impulse moves from a nerve in your stubbed toe to the part of your brain that senses pain.

Same when we take things personally. Someone says something and BAM! Electricity fires up a neuron, electricity is charged and an impulse is created—often the wrong one. We get upset, or mad, then we walk away or start up a fight. Of course, when it’s your boss or a coworker that sets off the ‘I’m taking this personally’ neuron, it’s not going to get you very far up the career path if you engage your fight or flight syndrome.

The best thing to do with all these neurons firing up in your brain and shooting electricity through every cell in your body is to HESITATE. Yes, hesitate. Take a breath. Sort your emotions out. Talk yourself down from the ledge, “Do I really want to take this personally? It’s got nothing to do with me. This person is angry at the world and I’m allowing their charge to ignite my charge. Well not this time buddy. I am going to stay calm! I will answer the question in a calm manner. And I will take powerful charge of my own emotions.”

Here are some additional interesting facts about your body. The following numbers are based on averages from various scientific studies…

In the next thirty seconds…You will have taken 8 breaths; breathed out 0.3 grams of carbon dioxide; your heart will have beaten 36 times; you will produce 72 million red blood cells; your blood will travel 4 miles; you will have shed 174,000 skin cells; you will blink 6 times; you will have 25 thoughts; and your body will generate 100 watts of energy. Maybe we should add ‘walking miracle’ to that list.

About the Author

Sarah’s latest book published by McGraw-Hill is titled Business Improv. It includes 75 activities on all aspect of business from Leadership skills to Emotional Intelligence. Sarah’s Business Improvisation based approach to learning has transformed work environments, changed lives and moved organisations forward. Her experience with the challenges leaders face allows her to help develop strategies and implementation plans that transform leaders into storytellers that move people to action. Her work with front line employees helps them communicate in a way that builds trust and collaboration. Sarah has taught Business Leadership to Executive MBA students at UCLA Anderson School of Management, Duke University Fuqua School of Business, Columbia University and the American University Cairo.

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